Category Archives: $$ Modest ($20-$40)

Oriental House's eggplant with garlic sauce

We look back at 2015, and way back at Oriental House

We’re just a few days into the New Year, and most of you foodies are probably already tired of reading many versions of the same basic story about all the new restaurants that joined the metro’s culinary community last year. So let’s not do that.

I’d like to tip my fedora to Baby 2016, though, by pulling up for a wider view: Was there any consistent flavor in the boiling, simmering, seething stew of the city’s eats beat in 2015? Continue reading

SuperChefs' veggie breakfast sandwich

SuperChefs look up for inspiration, get down with fine food

In a world as wild and wacky and wonderful as the one we live in, I’m reluctant to declare anything the only one of its kind. But the Last Supper painting in Chef Darren Ferguson’s newish SuperChefs in St. Matthews comes mighty close. Continue reading

From the top, three Indian breads, spinach aloo saag and veggie korma at Taj Palace

We miss Diwali but dine well at Taj Palace

If we lived in India, there’s no way we could have been unaware that last week was Diwali, the Festival of Lights, when Indians – and Hindus around the world – celebrate the triumph of good over evil with a holiday filled with lights, color, fireworks, music and dance and plenty of good things to eat.

Diwali is like Christmas, New Year’s, Thanksgiving and the Fourth of July all rolled into one, or in other words, about as big as Derby. Diwali doesn’t have much of a profile here in the U.S., though. Well, the Hindu Temple of Kentucky off Westport Road did have a celebration last week. We couldn’t find Diwali at any of the local restaurants, though, but that didn’t keep us from enjoying a delicious Indian meal at Taj Palace. Continue reading

Grilled pork-chop dinner with mashed potatoes and gravy, green beans and muffin at Cottage Inn

Home-style comfort food with a twist at Cottage Inn

Can a person – well, this person, anyway – ever get tired of international food, the vast smorgasbord of culinary delights from all the world’s regions? I would say not. Give me Indian, Mexican, Thai, Argentine, African, Chinese, German, Korean, Yugoslavian, French or German cuisine, and I’ll bounce right back in pursuit of the next fascinating thing. Continue reading

Joella's Half Bird with "Ella's Fave" spice

Which came first? The chicken or the egg?

“Which came first? The chicken or the egg?” Have you ever wondered about the ultimate answer to this existential question? Who hasn’t? We found a tasty answer at Con Huevos in Clifton: It’s both! Order up a ration of Tamal de Mole con Huevos, and you can have your egg and your chicken too, all gussied up in spicy-savory Mexican flavors.

But wait! There’s more! Just out the road a piece, the buzzy new Joella’s Hot Chicken is all about chicken, all of the time, and there’s nary an egg in sight. Eat all the chicken! Continue reading

Pad Thai at Thai Cafe

I want to bring the heat at Thai Cafe, but the chef won’t let me

Where in the world do you find the globe’s most fiery-spicy cuisine? This seemed like a simple enough question when I dreamed it up amid a sudden craving for culinary fire the other day, but it’s hard to get a definitive answer. Continue reading

America The Diner's hamburger

America. The Diner. Funky, fun and open almost 24 hours

Today let us celebrate the noble hamburger, an iconic confection that’s easier to eat than it is to research.

Aka “hamburg steak,” this ubiquitous ground-meat patty on a bun has been known by that name only since around the 1890s, the usually reliable Online Etymology Dictionary tells us. The hamburger’s historic connection to Hamburg, Germany, is also asserted but unproven, but that’s not important right now.
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It's Not Tofu sandwich and an order of fries at Epic Sammich Co.

Epic Sammich Co. is not Rumplings, but it’ll do

For a too-short, brilliant seven months, the glory that was Rumplings blazed like a comet soaring across the sky of Louisville’s dining scene.

Then, just like that, one night in early June, Rumplings went dark, accompanied by a chorus of wails from despairing fans.

Okay. I admit it. That’s kind of dramatic. But dammit, that’s how I felt, and judging from the anguished voices I heard, I don’t think I was alone.
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Tea Station Chinese Bistro's Mongolian Lamb

New urbanism, same old Chinese in Norton Commons

There we were, Mary and I, sitting and chatting as we waited for our apps in the comfortably cozy confines of Tea Station Chinese Bistro. We sipped Tsing Tao beers and gazed out at the main drag of Norton Commons, the new subdivision with the old-time look, trying to figure out why this village somehow feels both appealing and a little creepy all at the same time.

Norton Commons was Louisville’s first large venture into the “New Urbanism” (or at least the first since St. James Court was developed in 1887). Hey, New Urbanism is cool! Something new, made to look old, compact and walkable, retro in style, quaint but, um, “safe.”

So what’s not to like?
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Chile Relleno and a burrito at Mango's

On the Mexican road again …

“On the road again” … “En la carretera nuevamente …” Hmm. Willie Nelson’s classic ballad doesn’t translate very well, rhythmically speaking. You just can’t make the syllables fit the notes. But that’s not important right now. What’s important right now is Mexican food, because it’s filling and spicy and delicious.

I like Mexican food, and I like languages, and I’ve still got a lot to learn about both things. But there’s always room for more learning, both in the food department and the linguistic department. Like most Americans — er, Norteamericanos, that is — my language skills are weak.

“Eureka,” I said, an exclamation that works in English, Spanish and Greek. “Why don’t I go eat at some Mexican restaurants? I can practice my Spanish on the servers!”
Continue reading